Boston Terrier vs French Bulldog


What do a smart stylish dog and a sweet natured clown dog have in common? Beside their batlike ears, Boston terriers and French bulldogs  also share the same forefather—Bulldog. On appearance and temperament, they do share many similar qualities however they require different type of owner. Both Bostons and Frenchies are great people pleasers however Bostons are ideal family dogs while Frenchies are more of the monogamy type (only bond with one person) of dogs.

This is not to say you can’t have one of each living in the same household. You may need to make some adjustments and give proper trainings.



Boston Terrier vs. French Bulldog

Breed Boston Terrier French Bulldog
Country of Origin United States France
AKC / KC Groups Non-Sporting Group / Utility Group Non-Sporting Group / Utility Group
Original Function Companion Companion

 

 French bulldog

 Physical Appearance

Coat Color Brindle, seal, or black with even white markings—should be on muzzle, between eyes, blaze collar, forechest, and part or whole of forelegs and hindlegs. Brindle, fawn, or pied (predominantly white with brindle markings.
Coat Type Short and smooth Short, soft, and close lying
Head Square wrinkle free skull, jaw, and muzzle. The muzzle is deep and short, with a black nose. Very large, with a pushed-in muscular appearance and wrinkle skin. The upper lip hang low over the sides of the lower jaw.
Eyes Large, round, and set wide apart. Dark brown in color. Set low and far apart. Round and very dark brown.
Ears Small, thin, erect, and set at the corners of the skull. Big batlike ears but thin in texture.
Body Compact and quite muscular with a short back and loins. Chest is deep and wide. Wide body, heavy bone, muscular build. Deep chest and short back, arched over narrow loins and hindquarters.
Tail Set and carried low. Short and either straight or twisted. Set and carried low. Tapers rapidly to a point from a wide base.
Height 15 – 17 inches 11 – 13 inches
Weight 10 – 25 lbs. Three groups—15 lbs and under, 15 – 20 lbs, and up to 25 lbs. 24 – 28 lbs

 Temperament, Needs, and Learning

Overall Temperament Very affectionate, lively, and intelligent. Deeply affectionate, Sweet, amiable, easy going, adaptable
General Activity Moderate Moderately low
Exercise Requirement Needs daily exercises consist of short walks and free romp either indoor or in the yard. Moderate. Short walks and romp in the park
Grooming Requirement It’s an easy care coat with minimal shedding, needs only weekly brushing to remove dead hair. The face should be cleaned daily with a damp washcloth. It’s an easy care coat with minimal shedding, needs only weekly brushing to remove dead hair. The face should be cleaned daily with a damp washcloth.
Ideal Home Environment Due to its compact size, Boston terrier is an idea companion for city dwellers. However, he’s willing to stay with any homeowners who’d offer a spacious and shady yard. Very flexible dog. Apartment or house with a shady yard.
Ideal Owner Owner with a semi-active lifestyle. Must be affectionate, gentle, and patient. i.e. family with children and elderly. Frenchies need human companionship constantly. A “monogamy” kind of dog. Seniors or SOHOs or owners who can take dogs to work.
Special Needs Can be very vocal. So early training is advisable. Can become a couch potato. So give plenty of mental and short duration of physical activities.
Intelligence / Ranking Moderate / ranked no.54 Moderately low / rank no.58
Trainability Very strong-minded and a little stubborn but learn readily. Will only engage in activities that appear fun and interesting to them. Quite easy to train (if you make the training more like games) as long as you don’t expect collie-style of intelligent and standards.
Cold / Heat Tolerance Extremely low / extremely low moderately low / extremely low

Behavior

Excitability Moderate Low
Playfulness High. Loves games and people pleaser. Moderate
Demand for Affection Moderately high. High
Watchdog Barking Excellent barker (on demand). Love the sound of his own voice yet quiet at the same time. Low
Protection Low Low
Dominance Over Owner Low Low
Good With Dogs Great with other dogs at home but sometimes may be aggressive toward strange dogs. Moderately well. However, some males can be very territorial.
Good With Pets Moderately well. Excellent. Occasionally may chase cats.
Good With Children Get along very well with children of any age group. Moderately well. If your Frenchie is devoted to you, he may not be so willing to take commands from your children or vice versa.
Good With Strangers Reserved Very reserved.
Problematic Areas Like all brachycephalic (short-faced) breeds, Bostons may have breathing difficulties when exposed to heat or over exertion. Similar to Bostons and all short-nosed breeds, Frenchies snore and may wheeze and drool.

Health

Life Span 12 – 16 years 11 – 12 years
Major Aliments Brachycephalic syndrome Brachycephalic syndrome, spinal disc trouble
Minor Aliments Patellar luxation, allergies Patellar luxation, hemivertebra
Recommended Food Beef, fish Beef, wheat, oats

Source: www.smalldogsparadise.com

Fox Terrier Dog - A day in the life of an American Dog.

Airedale Terrier Dog breed

The Airedale Terrier (often shortened to "Airedale") is a breed of the terrier type, originating in Airedale, a geographic area in Yorkshire, England. It is traditionally called the "King of Terriers" because it is the largest of the terrier breeds. Having been bred from a Welsh Terrier and an Otter Hound, the breed has also been called the Waterside Terrier, because it was bred originally to hunt otters in and around the valleys of the River Aire which runs through Airedale. In England this breed has also been used as a police dog.



Appearance

The Airedale is the largest of the Terriers originating in Britain. They weigh 25–30 kilograms (55–66 lb) and have a height at the withers of 58–61 centimetres (23–24 in) for dogs, with females slightly smaller. The American Kennel Club  standard specifies a smaller dog. Larger ADTs, up to 55 kilograms (120 lb) can be found in the New World. They are often called "Oorangs." This was the name of a kennel in Ohio in the early 1900s.

The Airedale has a medium length black and tan coat with a harsh topcoat and a soft undercoat. They are an alert and energetic breed, "not aggressive but fearless."  It has been claimed that the large "hunting" type or Oorang airedales are more game than the smaller "show" type airedales. The large type are usually used for big game hunting and as family guardians or as pets, but usually do poorly in AKC conformation shows.The airedale terrier is the second largest of the terriers and stands square in appearance, with the largest being the Black Russian terrier.

Coat


Like many terriers, the breed has a 'broken' coat. The coat is hard, dense and wiry, not so long as to appear ragged, and lies straight and close, covering body and legs. The outer coat is hard, wiry and stiff, while the undercoat shorter and softer. The hardest coats are crinkling or just slightly waved. Curly soft coats are highly undesirable.


Airedales being shown are generally groomed by hand stripping where a small serrated edged knife is used to pull out loose hair from the dog's coat. With regular grooming, the Airedale may shed very little. Although the Airedale often appears on lists of dogs that do not shed (moult), this is misleading. Every hair in the dog coat grows from a hair follicle, and has a cycle of growing, then being shed, then being replaced by another hair in the same follicle. The length of time of the growing and shedding cycle varies by breed, age, and by whether the dog is an inside or outside dog. It may be that "there is no such thing as a nonshedding breed."

The "correct" (according to the AKC breed standard) coat color is either a black saddle, with a tan head, ears and legs; or a dark grizzle saddle (black mixed with gray and white).

Tail

The Airedale's tail is usually docked (surgically shortened) within five days of birth, but this is not a requirement of breed standard authorities. To show an Airedale in the United States, the official AKC  standard states "The root of the tail should be set well up on the back. It should be carried gaily but not curled over the back. It should be of good strength and substance and of fair length"., while in the UK  it is illegal to dock dogs' tails unless it is for the dog's benefit (e.g., if the tail is broken). Traditionally the fluffy tail is left long.

Eyes

The Airedale's eyes "should be dark in colour, small, not prominent, full of terrier expression, keenness and intelligence" Light or bold eyes are considered highly undesirable.

Some Airedales do suffer from eye diseases, such as congenital retina conditions.

Mouth

Airedales have a normal 'scissor bite', where the top teeth close over the bottom. The Airedale's teeth were developed in this way so he could defend himself against quarry he was originally bred to chase.

Size

Airedale terrier males should measure approximately 24 inches in height at the shoulder; bitches, slightly less. There is no mention of a specific weight, although the standard states that both sexes should be sturdy, well muscled and boned. At 23 to 24 inches, a dog should weigh approximately 50 - 70 pounds, being active and agile enough to perform well, while not too small to function as a physical deterrent, retriever or hunter. Some breeders have produced larger Airedale Terriers, such as the 'Oorang Airedale', developed in the 1920s.

Ex-Army captain and Airdale breeder Walter Lingo's monthly magazine "Oorang Comments" (#25, page 81), stated unequivocally that "When full grown your Airedale dog will weigh from forty to fifty-five pounds and if a female will weigh slightly less. This is the standard weight, but when required, we can furnish over-sized Airedales whose weight will be from sixty to one hundred pounds."

Because Lingo tried to fill orders for everyone, the Oorang strain size was never standardized. Airedales weighing from 40 to 100 pounds were produced, but for the most part they were approximately 50 pounds and 22 to 24 inches at the shoulder.

Temperament

The Airedale can be used as a working dog and also as a hunting dog. Airedales exhibit some herding characteristics as well, and have a propensity to chase animals. They have no problem working with cattle and livestock. However, an Airedale that is not well trained will agitate and annoy the animals. Strong-willed, with the tenacity commonly seen in terriers, the Airedale is a formidable opponent.

The Airedale Terrier, like most Terriers, has been bred to hunt independently. As a result, the dog is very intelligent, independent, strong-minded, stoic, and can sometimes be stubborn. They rank 29th in Stanley Coren's The Intelligence of Dogs, being of above average working/obedience intelligence. The Airedale is a dog with a great sense of humor. For those who can laugh along with their Airedale, the dog can provide a unique and entertaining company. For those who don't appreciate being outsmarted by their dog, owning an Airedale can be a trying experience. Patience and consistency in training will be rewarded as the Airedales have been known to reach great heights in competitive obedience, dog agility, and Schutzhund. Airedales need an owner that can be creative in teaching what is expected. Airedales usually get bored easily and need a trainer that has the ability to make working fun and exciting. Changing the routine or taking a play-break is much more productive than trying to force the Airedale. If children and Airedale are both trained correctly, Airedales can be an excellent choice for a family dog.

Albert Payson Terhune wrote of the Airedale: "Among the mine-pits of the Aire, the various groups of miners each sought to develop a dog which could outfight and outhunt and outthink the other miner's dogs. Tests of the first-named virtues were made in inter-mine dog fights. Bit by bit, thus, an active, strong, heroic, compactly graceful and clever dog was evolved – the earliest true form of the Airedale.

He is swift, formidable, graceful, big of brain, an ideal chum and guard. ....To his master he is an adoring pal. To marauders he is a destructive lightning bolt."

They are also very loving, always in the middle of the family activities. Airedales are also known for expressing exactly what they are thinking, unlike more aloof breeds. The Airedale is also a reliable and protective family pet. Airedales are exceedingly loyal and strong dogs; there is one story of an Airedale taking down a bear to protect its master. They are very energetic, and need plenty of exercise.

The Airedale is also stoic, able to withstand pain and injury. An Airedale's injuries and illnesses often go unnoticed until they become severe and require veterinary attention.The airedale terrier will usually do ok with children if they have early exposure and socialization, however they may play too rough for very small ones.

Health
Mortality

Airedale Terriers in UK, USA, and Canadian surveys had a median lifespan of about 11.5 years, which is similar to other breeds of their size.

In a 2004 UK Kennel Club survey, the most common causes of death were cancer (39.5%), old age (14%), urologic (9%), and cardiac (7%) . In a 2000–2001 USA/Canada Health Survey, the most common causes of death were cancer (38%), urologic (17%), old age (12%), and cardiac (6%).A very hardy breed,although some may suffer from eye problems,hip dysplasia and skin infections.



Morbidity

Airedales can be affected by hip dysplasia.

Like most terriers, they have a propensity towards dermatitis. Skin disorders may go unnoticed in Airedales, because of their hard, dense, wiry coats. Itchy skin may be manifest as acral lick dermatitis (caused by licking one area excessively) or acute moist dermatitis or "hot spots" (an oppressively itchy, inflamed and oozing patch of skin, made worse by intense licking and chewing). Allergies, dietary imbalances, and under/over-productive thyroid glands are the main causes of skin conditions.

An Airedale's coat was originally designed to protect the dog from its predators--the coat was designed to come out in the claws of the predator the dog was designed to hunt, leaving the dog unharmed. Because of this, some forms of skin dermatitis can respond to hand stripping the coat. Clipping the coat cuts the dead hair, leaving dead roots within the hair follicles. It is these dead roots which can cause skin irritations. However, hand stripping removes these dead roots from the skin and stimulates new growth. Hence this process can assist with some forms of skin irritations.

Gastric torsion, or bloat, affects Airedale Terriers. Bloat can turn and block the stomach, causing a buildup of gas. Bloat can be fatal, it can lead to cardiovascular collapse. Signs of bloat are gastric distress (stomach pain), futile attempts at vomiting, and increased salivation. Bloat usually occurs when the dog is exercised too soon after eating. They will eat up to 4-6 cups of food at a time.

History


Airedale, a valley (dale) in the West Riding of Yorkshire, named for the river Aire that runs through it, was the birthplace of the breed. In the mid-19th Century, working class people created the Airedale Terrier by crossing the old English rough-coated Black and Tan Terrier (now known as the Welsh Terrier) with the Otterhound. In 1886, the Kennel Club of England formally recognized the Airedale Terrier breed.

In 1864 they were exhibited for the first time at a championship dog show sponsored by the Airedale Agricultural Society. They were classified under different names, including Rough Coated, Bingley and Waterside Terrier. In 1879 breed fanciers decided to call the breed the Airedale Terrier, a name accepted by the Kennel Club (England) in 1886.

Well-to-do hunters of the era were typically accompanied by a pack of hounds and several terriers, often running them both together. The hounds would scent and pursue the quarry and the terriers would "go to ground" or enter into the quarry's burrow and make the kill. Terriers were often the sporting dog of choice for the common man. Early sporting terriers needed to be big enough to tackle the quarry, but not so big as to prevent them from maneuvering through the quarry's underground lair. As a result, these terriers had to have a very high degree of courage and pluck to face the foe in a tight, dark underground den without the help of human handlers.

During the middle of the nineteenth century, regular sporting events took place along the Aire River in which terriers pursued the large river rats that inhabited the area. A terrier was judged on its ability to locate a "live" hole in the riverbank and then, after the rat was driven from its hole by a ferret brought along for that purpose, the terrier would pursue the rat through water until it could make a kill. As these events became more popular, demand arose for a terrier that could excel in this activity. One such terrier was developed through judicious crossings of the Black-and-Tan Terrier and Bull and Terrier dogs popular at the time with the Otter Hound. The result was a long-legged fellow that would soon develop into the dog we recognize today as the Airedale Terrier. This character was too big to "go to ground" in the manner of the smaller working terriers; however, it was good at everything else expected of a sporting terrier, and it was particularly adept at water work. This big terrier had other talents in addition to its skill as a ratter. Because of its hound heritage it was blessed with the ability to scent game and the size to be able to tackle larger animals. It became more of a multipurpose terrier that could pursue game by powerful scenting ability, be broken to gun, and taught to retrieve. Its size and temperament made it an able guardian of farm and home. One of the colorful, but less-than legal, uses of the early Airedale Terrier was to assist its master in poaching game on the large estates that were off-limits to commoners. Rabbits, hare, and fowl were plentiful, and the Airedale could be taught to retrieve game killed by its master, or to pursue, kill, and bring it back itself.

The first imports of Airedale Terriers to North America were in the 1880s. The first Airedale to come to American shores was named Bruce. After his 1881 arrival, Bruce won the terrier class in a New York dog show.

The patriarch of the breed is considered to be CH Master Briar (1897–1906). Two of his sons, Crompton Marvel and Monarch, also made important contributions to the breed.

The first Canadian registrations are recorded in the Stud book of 1888–1889.

In 1910, the ATCA (Airedale Terrier Club of America) offered the Airedale Bowl as a perpetual trophy, which continues to this day. It is now mounted on a hardwood pedestal base, holding engraved plates with the names of the hundreds of dogs that have been awarded Best of Breed at the National Specialties.

The Airedale was extensively used in World War I to carry messages to soldiers behind enemy lines and transport mail. They were also used by the Red Cross to find wounded soldiers on the battlefield. There are numerous tales of Airedales delivering their messages despite terrible injury. An Airedale named 'Jack' ran through half a mile of enemy fire, with a message attached within his collar. He arrived at headquarters with his jaw broken and one leg badly splintered, and right after he delivered the message, he dropped dead in front of its recipient.

Lieutenant Colonel Edwin Hautenville Richardson was responsible for the development of messenger and guard dogs in the British Army. He, along with his wife, established a War Dog Training School at Shoeburyness in Essex, England. In 1916, they provided two Airedales (Wolf & Prince)for use as message carriers. After both dogs proved themselves in battle, Airedales were given more duties, such as locating injured soldiers on the battlefield, an idea taken from the Red Cross.

Before the adoption of the German Shepherd as the dog of choice for law enforcement and search and rescue work, the Airedale terrier often filled this role.

In 1906, Richardson tried to interest the British Police in using dogs to accompany officers, for protection on patrol at night. Mr. Geddes, Chief Goods Manager for Hull Docks in Yorkshire, was convinced after he went saw the impressive work of police dogs in Belgium. Geddes convinced Superintendent Dobie of the North Eastern Railway Police, to arrange a plan for policing the docks. Airedale Terriers were selected for duty as police dogs because of their intelligence, good scenting abilities and their hard, wiry coats that were easy to maintain and clean.

At the beginning of the Russo-Japanese war in 1904, the Russian embassy in London contacted Lt. Colonel Richardson for help acquiring dogs for the Russian Army, trained to take the wounded away from the battlefields. He sent terriers, mostly Airedale Terriers, for communication and sanitary services. Although these original imports perished, Airedale Terriers were reintroduced to Russia in the early 1920s for use by the Red Army. Special service dog units were created in 1923, and Airedale Terriers were used as demolition dogs, guard dogs, police tracking dogs and casualty dogs.

Two Airedales were among the dogs lost with the sinking of the RMS Titanic. The Airedale "Kitty" belonged to Colonel John Jacob Astor IV, the real-estate mogul. The second Airedale belonged to William E. Carter of Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. Mr. Carter was the owner of the Renault automobile in which Jack and Rose trysted in the movie "Titanic". Carter, his wife and two children survived the sinking.

During the 1930s, when airedales were farmed like livestock, American breeders developed the Oorang airedale.

Capt. Walter Lingo, of LaRue, Ohio, developed the Oorang Airedale strain. The name came from a line of bench champions, headed by King Oorang 11, a dog which was said to have been the finest utility dog. King could retrieve waterfowl and upland game, tree raccoons, drive cattle and sheep, and bay mountain lions, bears, and wolves. King even fought one of the best fighting bull terriers, and killed his opponent. He also trained in Red Cross work, and served the American Expeditionary Force at the front in France.

Lingo simply wasn't satisfied with the average strain of Airedale, and after an incredible series of breedings, for which he brought in great Airedales from all over the world, he created the "King Oorang." At the time, Field and Stream magazine called it, "the greatest utility dog in the history of the world." The Oorang Kennel Company continued until Walter Lingo's death in 1969. To help promote the King Oorang, as well as his kennels, Lingo created the Oorang Indians football team headed up by Jim Thorpe. The team played in National Football League from 1922–1923. Jerry Siebert, an Airedale breeder in Buckeye Lake, Ohio, followed in Lingo's footsteps, and bred "Jerang Airedales." There is a kennel in Tennessee that claims to have original Oorang Airedales.

Dogs of close to 100 pounds and upwards may carry the medical and behavioral problems associated with the 1930s airedale. Many large airedales can be as robust, energetic and agile as much smaller dogs with the same life span as smaller airedales.

After the First World War, the Airedales' popularity rapidly increased thanks to stories of their bravery on the battlefield and also because Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Calvin Coolidge, and Warren Harding owned Airedales. President Harding's Airedale was named Laddie Boy.

President Roosevelt claimed that "An Airedale can do anything any other dog can do and then lick the other dog, if he has to."

1949 marked the peak of the Airedales' popularity in the USA, ranked 20th out of 110 breeds by the American Kennel Club. The breed has since slipped to 50th out of 146.

Marion Robert Morrison, otherwise known as John Wayne, grew up in Glendale, California. His neighbors called him "Big Duke," because he never went anywhere without his Airedale Terrier, "Little Duke". He preferred "Duke" to "Marion," and the name stuck for the rest of his life.

The Airedale Terrier was recognized by United Kennel Club in 1914.

The Airedale Terrier, because of its joyful disposition and energy, was one of the first breeds, along with the Giant Schnauzer and the Rottweiler, used to create the Black Russian Terrier.

The Airedale is the current mascot for Alma High School (Alma, Arkansas).

One of the Giles Family, cornerstone characters of Carl Giles' cartoon series from the Daily Express in England, included Butch, an Airedale Terrier.

Why you love a Border Terrier - Video

Bull Terrier Breed Standard


White
The Bull Terrier must be strongly built, muscular, symmetrical and active, with a keen determined and intelligent expression, full of fire but of sweet disposition and amenable to discipline.


Head
Should be long, strong and deep right to the end of the muzzle, but not coarse. Full face it should be oval in outline and be filled completely up giving the impression of fullness with a surface devoid of hollows or indentations, i.e., egg shaped. In profile it should curve gently downwards from the top of the skull to the tip of the nose. The forehead should be flat across from ear to ear. The distance from the tip of the nose to the eyes should be perceptibly greater than that from the eyes to the top of the skull. The underjaw should be deep and well defined.


Lips
Should be clean and tight.

Teeth
Should meet in either a level or in a scissors bite. In the scissors bite the upper teeth should fit in front of and closely against the lower teeth, and they should be sound, strong and perfectly regular.


Ears
Should be small, thin and placed close together. They should be capable of being held stiffly erect, when they should point upwards.


Eyes
Should be well sunken and as dark as possible, with a piercing glint and they should be small, triangular and obliquely placed; set near together and high up on the dog's head. Blue eyes are a disqualification.


Nose
Should be black, with well-developed nostrils bent downward at the tip.


Neck
Should be very muscular, long, arched and clean, tapering from the shoulders to the head and it should be free from loose skin.

Chest
Should be broad when viewed from in front, and there should be great depth from withers to brisket, so that the latter is nearer the ground than the belly.


Body
Should be well rounded with marked spring of rib, the back should be short and strong. The back ribs deep. Slightly arched over the loin. The shoulders should be strong and muscular but without heaviness. The shoulder blades should be wide and flat and there should be a very pronounced backward slope from the bottom edge of the blade to the top edge. Behind the shoulders there should be no slackness or dip at the withers. The underline from the brisket to the belly should form a graceful upward curve.

Legs
Should be big boned but not to the point of coarseness; the forelegs should be of moderate length, perfectly straight, and the dog must stand firmly upon them. The elbows must turn neither in nor out, and the pasterns should be strong and upright. The hind legs should be parallel viewed from behind. The thighs very muscular with hocks well let down. Hind pasterns short and upright. The stifle joint should be well bent with a well-developed second thigh.

Feet
Round and compact with well-arched toes like a cat.


Tail
Should be short, set on low, fine, and ideally should be carried horizontally. It should be thick where it joins the body, and should taper to a fine point.


Coat
Should be short, flat, harsh to the touch and with a fine gloss. The dog's skin should fit tightly.

Color
Is white though markings on the head are permissible. Any markings elsewhere on the coat are to be severely faulted. Skin pigmentation is not to be penalized.


Movement
The dog shall move smoothly, covering the ground with free, easy strides, fore and hind legs should move parallel each to each when viewed from in front or behind. The forelegs reaching out well and the hind legs moving smoothly at the hip and flexing well at the stifle and hock. The dog should move compactly and in one piece but with a typical jaunty air that suggests agility and power.

Faults
Any departure from the foregoing points shall be considered a fault and the seriousness of the fault shall be in exact proportion to its degree, i.e. a very crooked front is a very bad fault; a rather crooked front is a rather bad fault; and a slightly crooked front is a slight fault.

Disqualification
Blue eyes.

Colored
The Standard for the Colored Variety is the same as for the White except for the sub head "Color" which reads: Color. Any color other than white, or any color with white markings. Other things being equal, the preferred color is brindle. A dog which is predominantly white shall be disqualified.

Disqualifications
Blue eyes.
Any dog which is predominantly white.


Approved July 9, 1974